Monday, 17 October 2011

Not really relevant to knitting but good food for thought none the less...

'In Some Games, It's the Pattern, Not the Plot, That Makes Them Beautiful'


From popmatters.com


http://www.popmatters.com/pm/post/148265-in-some-games-its-the-pattern-not-the-plot-that-makes-them-beautiful/

I came across this article and it got me thinking about some of the issues I've been having in my painting work. My aim is to find a relationship between my painting practice and the medium of video games, and this mini essay relates to both directly in terms of narrative and abstraction.


Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Mark Newport



http://www.marknewportartist.com/


Tabernacle Twins


"The newly established design label TABERNACLE TWINS explores the limits between fashion, textile and illustration. Working with imaginary sceneries visual stories are being transformed into colourful womenswear focusing on prints, shapes and knitwear."


quote and images from http://www.tabernacletwins.com/

I love the structure of these knitwear pieces! Really dramatic, confident, chunky silhouettes. I think these make for brilliant food for thought. Also, they also have some lovely print design and interesting colour schemes in their collections. 



Tuesday, 11 October 2011

Work in progress...Madeira Cascade Pattern

Here's a section of a full-length gold dress I've been knitting for a while now (something tells me it's going to take a long time to finish). I come back to it every now and then, but I've not got properly stuck in for a while now.


I wanted to post how to knit the type of stitch I've been using. I found it in a really old library book of all sorts of stitches, I'll probably post a load more from that book soon because there's loads of lovely ones.




MADEIRA CASCADE PATTERN
multiple of 20 plus 5
Row 1: Purl
Row 2: Knit
Row 3: K2, *K1, yon, K8, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K8, yon; repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3.
Rows 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 18: Purl
Row 5: K2, *K2, yon, K7, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K7, yon, K1; repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3.
Row 7: K2, K2tog, *yon, K1, yon, K6, sl.1, K2tog, psso; repeat from * to last 4 sts, yon, K2tog tbl, K2.
Row 9: K2, *K4, yon, K5, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K5, yon, K3; repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3
Row 11: K2, *K1, yon, sl.1, psso, yon, K1, yon, K4, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K4, yon, K1, yon, sl.1, K2tog, psso, yon; repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3.
Row 13: K2, *K6, yon, K3, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K3, yon, K5;repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3.
Row 15: K2, K2tog, *yon, K1, yon, sl.1, K2tog, psso, yon, K1, yon, K2, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K2, (yon, K1, yon, sl.1, K"tog, psso) twice; repeat from * to last 4 sts, yon, K2tog tbl, K2.
Row 17: K2, *K8, yon, K1, sl.1, K2tog, psso, K1, yon, K7; repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3
Row 19: K2, *(K1, yon,sl.1, K2tog, psso, yon) five times; repeat from * to last 3 sts, K3.
Row 20: Knit




Chunky Mittens

YARN
Something nice and super chunky, perhaps Rowan Big Wool - 100gm ball
(I doubled up a not quite so chunky wool)


NEEDLES
1 pair 10mm (US 15) needles


TENSION
8 1/2 sts and 13 rows to 10cm squared. measured over stocking stitch using 10mm needles.


This doesn't have to be exact, you might want to experiment to get the perfect hand size for you.
(This pattern fits an average sized adult hand)




RIGHT MITTEN
Cast on 20 sts.
Begin with a K row, cont in st st as follows:
Work 16 rows, ending with WS row.*
Shape for thumb
Next row (RS): K 15 and turn.
**Next row: Cast on and P 5 sts, P 5 and turn
Work 6 rows in st st on these 10 sts.
Break yarn and thread throught the remaining 10 sts. Pull tight and fasten off securely. Sew together the thumb seem.
With RS facing, rejoin yarn at base of thumb, pick up and K 5 sts from base of thumb. K to end. (20 sts)
Work a further 15 rows over all sts ending with a WS row.
Next row (RS): (K2tog) 10 times.
Break yarn and thread through remaining 10 sts. Pull tight and fasten off securely. Sew thogether the side seam.


LEFT MITTEN
Work the same as for right mitten to *.
Shape for thumb
Next row (RS): K 10 and turn.
Complete as for right mitten from **.

Tuesday, 4 October 2011

Army Balaclava




This balaclava pattern also came from the V&A set of war time knits, and is a real no-frills survival type garment. I made this for Leo (who kindly modelled it for me) so he could wear it in the cold (and feel a bit like 'action man'). I think it'll be nice and comfortable to wear and it won't cover the face too much, so hopefully it won't look too menacing :-/...


It only needed 100g ball of cheap-o double knit, so it was a bargain really!

Here's a link to the V&A patterns so you can get the pattern:
http://www.vam.ac.uk/images/image/12972-popup.html 

Comfortable Ladies Helmet

I came across the pattern for this soft ladies helmet/balaclava on the V&A knitting website. They've got loads of brilliant old war time knitting patterns and I plan to make quite a few of them. 
http://www.vam.ac.uk/images/image/12972-popup.html  


It was really easy to knit and well explained. I used a different yarn to what was suggested however, and so I don't think the tension was quite right (it should probably sit a little tighter on my head). But I don't think it matters really. 


To fasten the chin strap I used an old brown button from my mum's old faithful button tin.